Anti Doping

British Rowing have announced (2016) that the following Prohibited List applies to all rowers in the UK


The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has announced the 2017 Prohibited List (the List), which will come into effect on 1 January 2017.

The List, which is updated at least annually, identifies substances and methods which athletes are prohibited from using under the anti-doping rules. WADA consults extensively with a wide range of stakeholders - including athletes, National Anti-Doping Organisations, International Federations and scientists - before changes are made and approved by the WADA List Expert Group.

The List is published annually in October to ensure athletes and their support personnel have sufficient time to make themselves aware of the changes, review any current medications in use and apply for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) if required before the new List comes into effect on 1 January 2017.

A summary of key modifications to the 2017 Prohibited List include:

Substances and Methods Prohibited at All Times

S2. Peptide Hormones, Growth Factors, Related Substances and Mimetics:
• GATA Inhibitors (e.g. K-11706) & Transforming Growth Factor-β (e.g. sotatercept, luspatercept) have been added in 2017

S3. Beta-2 Agonists:

Salbutamol Inhalers (aka Albuterol or marketed as Ventolin)
• Commonly used to treat asthma. Previously, an inhaled dosage of no greater than 1600 micrograms was permitted over 24 hours. However, it was never the intention that this meant that athletes could inhale 1600 micrograms in one go or over a few hours
• Dosing parameters of inhaled salbutamol have been amended to reflect that athletes are allowed a maximum of 1600 micrograms over 24 hours, but not to exceed 800 micrograms every 12 hours
• Salbutamol inhalers commonly dispense either 100 or 200 micrograms per puff/inhalation, this relates to an allowance of either 8 or 4 inhalations respectively per 12-hour period
• Dose per inhalation can vary between inhalers, therefore athletes should ask their doctor or check the patient information leaflet which accompanies their prescribed inhaler to establish the dose administered in each inhalation
• If an athlete requires more than 800 micrograms in a 12-hour period they should consult their doctor and contact UKAD to determine if they need to apply for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE)

Salmeterol
• Commonly used to treat asthma
• It is usually administered via inhalation twice a day, in the morning and evening, about 12 hours apart
• Under the 2017 List, the maximum allowable dosage of salmeterol has been defined for the first time as “200 micrograms over 24 hours”. This is consistent with manufacturers’ recommendations
• In previous versions of the List, no dosage was provided and instead athletes were advised that inhaled salmeterol was permitted “in accordance with the manufactures’ recommended therapeutic regimen”
• Dose per inhalation can vary between inhalers, therefore athletes should ask their doctor or check the patient information leaflet which accompanies their prescribed inhaler to establish the dose administered in each inhalation
• If an athlete requires more than 200 micrograms over 24 hours, they should consult their doctor and contact UKAD to determine if they need to apply for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE).

Substances and Methods Prohibited In-Competition Only

S6. Stimulants:
• Lisdexamfetamine is currently prohibited. In 2017 it will be classed as a non-specified stimulant

S7. Narcotics:
• Nicomorphine has been added to the List in 2017
• Nicomorphine is an opioid drug which is used in the treatment of severe pain
• It also converts to morphine following administration. Morphine is already prohibited under section 7 of the List

Prohibited Methods

M1. Manipulation of Blood and Blood Components
• Clarified that supplemental oxygen administered intravenously is prohibited, but administration by inhalation is permitted

Monitoring Programme

The following were added to the 2017 Monitoring Programme to establish patterns of use:
• Codeine
• Concurrent use of multiple beta-2-agonists

 

UK Anti-Doping Chief Executive, Nicole Sapstead said: “It is incredibly important that athletes and their support staff check the changes made to the List each year, so they do not inadvertently break the rules - under the anti-doping rules, athletes are responsible for what is in their system, regardless of how it got there.

“The List outlines the substances and methods which are banned in sport but does not outline in which medications these substances are found. Our guidance is straightforward – athletes must check their medications before use on Global DRO – an online tool which provides information about the prohibited or permitted status of branded medications and ingredients licensed for sale in the UK, USA, Canada, Japan or Australia.

“As the List changes on 1 January 2017, it is also important that athletes renew searches of regular or recurring medications.

“Additionally, WADA has also highlighted some Prohibited Substances which may be found in supplements, such as Delta 2 and higenamine. WADA has also taken the opportunity in this year’s List to provide clarity around vitamin B12, which is permitted despite containing cobalt, which is prohibited under the List.

“Athletes who wish to use, or are already using supplements, must ensure that they carry out thorough research prior to use by using tools such as Informed Sport. No supplement product can ever guarantee that it is free from Prohibited Substances, therefore athletes must assess the need, risk and consequences before making a decision to take a supplement.”

full summary of the 2017 Major Modifications and Explanatory Notes is available on the WADA website.

Further information can also be found on the Prohibited List section or via our free 100% me Clean Sport App available to download via iTunesGoogle Play or the Windows Store.